5 Benefits of Strength Training for Men 45yrs+ - Hybrid
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5 Benefits of Strength Training for Men 45yrs+

 

Have you ever wondered how strength training might benefit you as you get older? Strength training should be essential to everyone, especially as we age. As men get older, they lose muscle mass by up to an average of 4.5lbs per year, testosterone lowers, bone density decreases, risk of injuries, illness and accidents increases. 

 

The good news is that strength training can massively help to slow down the aging process. Here are 5 key benefits of strength training for men, aged 45 and over:

 

 

1. IMPROVE BONE DENSITY

 

Bone density decreases with age, which can result in issues such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and other bone diseases and joint pain related issues. A decrease in bone density also increases the risk of fractures. By lifting weights consistently and engaging in strength training, you can actually increase bone density, to lower the risks of fractures and other bone diseases.

 

2. RETAIN MUSCLE MASS

 

Loss of muscle mass (known as sarcopenia) is something that happens as we age. Research suggests that men who are sedentary lose up to an average 4.5lbs of muscle per year from the age of 40, which is largely due to the inactivity and disuse of muscles. A reduction in muscle mass means a reduction in physical strength. For this reason, engaging in consistent strength training is the best way to retain muscle mass as you get older, and even increase muscle mass as a result of regular strength training. 

 

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3. BOOST TESTOSTERONE

 

When men get older, testosterone lowers. A low testosterone level may lead to osteoporosis as a result of bone thinning due to low testosterone. Low testosterone can also lead to andropause, erectile dysfunction, and potentially an increase of estrogen (the female hormone), which can cause hot flashes (like women going through menopause), poor sleep quality, reduced testicle size, man boobs, and fat storage around the hips, belly and thighs. Strength training is one of the best (and easiest) ways for men to boost their testosterone.

 

 

4. INCREASE MOBILITY AND FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT 

 

 

Our range of movement decreases with age; which means your joints do not move as well as they might have done in your 20s and 30s. If we have poor mobility, our movement quality will also suffer; which increases the risk of musculoskeletal injuries and issues such as stiff joints and back pain. Regular strength training also improves functional movement which portrays into our daily life when we do simple things such as carry groceries, picking up a box, lifting an item overhead just to name a few.

 

 

 

5. IMPROVE METABOLISM

 

Remember being in your teenage years and eating huge quantities of food? You might notice that the older you get, the lower your appetite, and the less you are able to eat. That is because metabolism speed decreases with age; which correlates to loss of muscle mass and physical inactivity. Your metabolism is basically a bunch of chemical reactions that keep you alive, but it is also what determines how many calories you burn in a day. You do not only burn calories when you are working out or moving around, you also burn calories while you are resting and sleeping (this is your Resting Metabolic Rate).  Strength training helps to “boost” metabolism because it promotes an increase in lean body mass; the more muscle mass you have, the more calories you burn.

 

At Hybrid, we believe that anything is possible with the right guidance, support, and attitude – you can learn a new skill, and start training at any age. You don’t have to be great to start, but you have to start to be great! 

 

Get started in strength training today and book your free personal training assessment; contact us at info@hybridmmafit.com

 

Article by: Kimberly Slider, Hybrid MMA & Fitness

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